This is the Science Creative Quarterly. In which, with respect to our name, we are as confused as you are.

NEUROTECH LIGHT AND DARK

By | archive, creative

A brain-computer interface controls her robotic arm. As easily as not thinking, she uses it to drink another shot of tequila.

I feel a tic escape, as my deep brain stimulation implant remodulates its signal. But I’m not dropping my coffee anymore.

The veteran’s brain implant doesn’t control his PTSD symptoms well, plus he has paranoia about mind control experiments by the government.

A technician sends the telerobotic neurosurgeon a brain scan on her phone. A crack in the screen leads to the patient becoming a savant.

An fMRI scanner noisily starts up. An undetected tattoo heats up from metal in the ink. Blood oxygen flow is scanned as the patient yelps.

The team designs a new robot to give homeless people showers, but get no takers until they offer free opioid electrostimulation with a wash.

The neuroethicist testifies at the murder trial of a man with schizophrenia. An experimental medication worsened psychosis during the crime.

An earworm is silenced by white noise through her cochlear implant. Always handy to have a fan in the room.

The deep brain stimulation implant short circuits and his neuron firing patterns change. He starts trembling and craving a youthful sexbot.

A boy with autism uses a robot to talk to his parents, while he casts his eyes down. They agree to give him a raise in his allowance.

His defence lawyer tries to introduce a neurologist to say he wasn’t responsible. The judge won’t allow it for a parking ticket case.

The amputee’s exoskeleton is controlled by a brain computer interface, and she thinks happy thoughts as she walks along the beach.

Signals from a strip mall trigger augmented reality in my artificial eye. it displays a spam message. I delete it, with an annoyed blink.

My boss’s roboenchantment fills the boardroom with telepresence robots, so neuroscientists meet remotely. Half of us are pantsless.

Police use an EEG lie detector on the suspect, but he knows how to fool it. He returns to his college dorm, planning another bank hit.

Modulating my brain implant with a switch in my neck, I treat symptoms of hypomania from jet lag with a higher pulse. Soon, I fall asleep.

Analyzing data from an EEG experiment on reaction times and impulse control disorders, the neuroscientist finds a link to Twitter usage.

Biometric cameras track the eye movements of a paralyzed man, allowing him to type. He writes a novel from his bed, ending it with rebirth.

About S. Kay

S. Kay is a systematic @blueberrio, interested in technology, neuroscience, and kale. For modern morsels of microfiction, follow @blueberrio and blueberrio.tumblr.com.