And we’re back!

The Science Creative Quarterly (SCQ) is not a quarterly, but instead publishes new material at a non-linear rate. It seeks science writing of any genre and if you’d like to contribute, please do check out our submissions guidelines.

The Science Creative Quarterly (SCQ) has a single print edition so far (half SCQ pieces, and half fake science journal – see here for more details). The theme for our second print edition will revolve around the science of Harry Potter. Like before, this will also include some of our newer favourite creative pieces, so if you want to get in on this action and get your name in a (sort of) scientific journal, then do submit. Also, badges?

Stay safe everyone!

The 2020 Gairdner Award Winners: Picturing Science in the Classroom

Every year, the Gairdner Awards celebrate science and research excellence in the medical health areas. Since 1957, they have given out 395 awards – 95 of these recipients would go on to also win a Nobel Prize! In collaboration with the Canadian Society of Molecular Biosciences and the Michael Smith Laboratories at UBC, these materials were produced to provide a series of articles, comics, videos and accompanying lesson ideas to celebrate the science of a selection of the 2020 Canada Gairdner Awardees. This builds on the Gairdner Foundation’s partnership with CSMB and Michael Smith Laboratories at UBC, which began last…

How To Fly

“The knack of flying is learning how to throw yourself at the ground and miss” With these words, Douglas Adams helpfully explained concept of flying in his Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy. But the ground is really big, and, as the Tick so sagely noted, “Gravity is a harsh mistress.” So herein contained is my handy-dandy explanation of how you can impress your friends and family by throwing yourself at the ground and missing: Step one, throw yourself at the ground. Luckily, this is really easy thanks to gravity, which will pull you down to the ground at an acceleration…

A Serious Game on Gender Inequity and the Health Arena

It doesn’t take long to scan today’s headlines, and note the troubling incidents of #metoo, or hear word of research disparities that could potentially lead to life threatening outcomes for women. The reality is that even with the slow march of progress, there is still significant inequities in how the genders are treated in the health arena, if not society in general. This applies to both the medical research specifically (do treatments work better for men generally?), as well as the challenges that many women face in their career trajectories (how does gender affect careers?). Patriarchy, in a word, is…

Some COVID-19 Questions From a Curious and Concerned Seven Year Old

I got this letter the other day and it’s awesome! I thought I would try my best to answer these great COVID-19 questions. Thanks Alaina! 1. Where does the virus actually come from? Right now, the best answer is likely from one of these: Yup, a bat. But how it changed from a virus that infects bats to one that infects humans is still not really known. However, this sort of thing has happened before and the science word for it is zoonosis. This is where a disease which would normally only infect an animal (in this case a bat),…

Charity Wanjiku: Empowering with Power

Kenyan native Charity Wanjiku was first inspired to study architecture at the age of 10 when she saw a TV commercial for an insurance company where a businesswoman was presenting a model house to a boardroom of applauding men. Determined to pursue her passion — despite the fact that very few women enrolled in architecture courses — Wanjiku eventually graduated from the Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology with a Bachelor of Architecture degree. Later, she earned her Master’s degree in Project Management in Construction. It was at her first job where she discovered her interest in project management.…

Eugenia Duodu: Inspired, Elevated and Empowered

Dr. Eugenia Duodu earned an honours Bachelor of Science degree in Chemistry and Biology from the University of Toronto in 2010, and proceeded to study medicinal chemistry as a PhD student. Fueled by her passion to improve life for others, her research focused on providing effective treatments for human diseases such as cancer. Having grown up in a low-income community and experiencing numerous disparities to enriched science-based opportunities, Dr. Duodu sought out ways to share STEM with her community. It was at this time that she signed up as a part-time volunteer with Visions of Science Network for Learning Inc.…

Nadine Caron: Barrier Breaking Surgeon

Dr. Nadine Caron was born in Kamloops, British Columbia. In 1993, she earned her Bachelor of Science degree in Kinesiology at Simon Fraser University, where she was also a star basketball player. From there, she entered medical school at the University of British Columbia, eventually graduating at the top of her class and becoming the first First Nations woman to graduate from the program. Dr. Caron proceeded to Harvard University, where she earned a Master’s degree in Public Health. She went on to the University of California, San Francisco to complete her postgraduate fellowship training in Endocrine Surgical Oncology. In…

I Can’t Breathe

  https://content.blubrry.com/citedpodcast/SS_EP_5_I_Cant_Breath.mp3   Note that this podcast episode is part of a series on the various secondary effects of the COVID-19 pandemic. Click here to see more on their wesbite. * * *     The brutal public lynching of George Floyd has sparked a rebellion against police violence and systematic racism. The mostly peaceful protests are courageously rising up, while the police respond with unrelenting force. This all-out war against the American people tells us much about the government’s priorities; while nurses struggle to get basic protective equipment to fight the COVID-19 pandemic, over-funded police forces patrol American streets…

Euphemia Haynes: Fighting the Track

Euphemia Haynes (1890-1980) was an African-American mathematician, educator and activist. She attended Smith College in Massachusetts and earn her Bachelor of Arts degree in mathematics in 1914, also later obtaining a Master of Arts degree in education from the University of Chicago in 1930. That same year, she became a professor at Miner Teachers College, where she founded the college’s mathematics department. Here, she was the head for nearly thirty years; focusing on the education of African-American teachers. During this time, she also went back to school and obtained her PhD in mathematics from Catholic University in 1943, making her…